New infrastructure deal must focus on climate, activists say

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President Joe Biden speaks about infrastructure spending at the La Crosse Municipal Transit Authority on Tuesday, June 29, 2021, in La Crosse, Wis. Climate activists and their Democratic allies in Congress are pressing with renewed urgency for huge investments to slow global warming. (Evan Vucci, Associated Press)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Climate activists and their Democratic allies in Congress are pressing with renewed urgency for huge investments to slow global warming, after a bipartisan infrastructure plan cut out some of President Joe Biden’s key climate initiatives.

Supporters say a larger, Democratic-only package now being developed in Congress must meet Biden’s promise to move the country toward carbon-free electricity, make America a global leader in electric vehicles and create millions of jobs in solar, wind and other clean- energy industries.

But passage of a larger, multitrillion-dollar bill faces significant hurdles, even if Democrats use a procedural method that requires only a simple majority. It’s far from certain, in an evenly divided Senate, that moderate Democrats will agree to an expansive measure that could swell to as high as $6 trillion.

On the other hand, a less costly bill that does not fully address climate change risks losing support from large numbers of liberal Democrats who have pledged action on an issue that Biden has called “the existential crisis of our times.”

Elimination of climate measures in the bipartisan plan comes as the effects of climate change, like worsening disasters such as hurricanes, wildfires and drought, are increasing. Scientists urge immediate action to slash greenhouse emissions to avoid the worst consequences of global warming.

“The bipartisan infrastructure deal is not a climate bill,” said Jamal Raad, executive director of Evergreen Action, an advocacy group that has pushed for urgent action on climate change. “And we know that fossil fuel lobbyists in Washington are already hard at work to eliminate key climate provisions from the (Democrat-only) package.

“To meet this moment, Democrats must stand firm and pass a package that makes historic investments in climate, jobs and justice,″ he said.

Even the bipartisan agreement is not certain to pass a closely divided Congress. A framework announced June 24 by Biden and a bipartisan group of senators does not include legislative provisions and many details need to be worked out.

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden, D-Ore., called the bipartisan deal inadequate when his state and others in the West face a record heat wave and destructive wildfires. “It will not include comprehensive clean energy policy, and I am not willing to support throwing climate change overboard,” Wyden said. “The two bills have to be directly connected.”

The $973 billion bipartisan deal includes money to build a national network of electric vehicle charging stations, purchase thousands of electric buses and upgrade the electrical grid. It also would spend $55 billion to improve drinking water and wastewater systems and $47 billion in resiliency efforts to tackle climate change.

But many climate-related proposals were cut out, including plans promoted by Biden to make electricity carbon-free by 2035 and spend hundreds of billions in tax incentives for clean energy such as wind and solar power and technologies that capture and store carbon emissions.

In La Crosse, Wisconsin, last week, Biden highlighted projects that would get more money from the bipartisan bill, such as hybrid buses and road repair equipment. And the White House says climate considerations will be a key part of a plan for infrastructure, jobs and education that would be determined solely by Democrats through a “budget reconciliation” process in Congress.

Activists say the bipartisan framework falls short on nearly every important climate commitment Biden laid out in his initial proposal in the spring, including energy upgrades for buildings, a Civilian Climate Corps and massive spending on environmental justice.

The White House, saying it is holding firm on Biden’s ideas, released a memo last week reaffirming its commitment to bolster the electric vehicle market, make buildings and property more resilient to harsh weather patterns and ensure the country’s electrical grid becomes carbon-free by 2035.

Environmental groups say that is not enough.

A Department of Homeland Security helicopter uses its rotor wash to stir up dirt as activists take materials to build barricades at an occupied Enbridge Line 3 pump station near Park Rapids, Minn. on June 7, 2021. Climate activists and their Democratic allies in Congress are pressing with renewed urgency for huge investments to slow global warming.
A Department of Homeland Security helicopter uses its rotor wash to stir up dirt as activists take materials to build barricades at an occupied Enbridge Line 3 pump station near Park Rapids, Minn. on June 7, 2021. Climate activists and their Democratic allies in Congress are pressing with renewed urgency for huge investments to slow global warming. (Photo: Evan Frost, Minnesota Public Radio)

“This is a historic, narrow opportunity to combat the climate crisis, and we can’t afford to kick the can down the road any further,” said Lauren Maunus, advocacy director for the Sunrise…



Read More:New infrastructure deal must focus on climate, activists say

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